Monday, February 24, 2014

Diet Like a Dog






















What if you took care of yourself as well as you do your dog? In this episode Dr. Nina gives suggestions on how to feel doggone better and train yourself to have a healthier, happier relationship to food."

Check out this episode!

What if you took care of yourself as well as you do your dog?  In this episode Dr. Nina gives suggestions on how to feel doggone better and train yourself to have a healthier, happier relationship to food.

If you have a dog, or know someone who does, think of how much better life would be if you treated yourself as well as you treat your dog - or the way your friends treat their dogs - assuming they take good care of them.

If you have a bone to pick with yourself about your weight, you can train yourself to think differently about your physical and emotional needs, wants, feelings and conflicts.

Dr. Nina offers specific suggestions on how to change your mind, which shifts the way you feel, and changes your behavior with food.  When you feel better, you don’t need food for comfort or distraction – and that’s how you win the diet war!


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Saturday, February 15, 2014

Feeling Out Of Control?

FEELING OUT OF CONTROL?


“I was totally out of control with ice cream last week.”
“I didn’t eat anything all day and felt completely in control.”
“I hate getting mad because I feel so out of control.”



If you are struggling with disordered eating, the very thing you are trying to control (food, weight, and so forth) is actually controlling you.

Often, controlling food is a response to feelings of powerlessness in other areas of your life.   It’s easier to focus on your intake of food or your weight than to deal with an unpredictable boss, teacher, significant other or friend.  The wish to manage a person or situation morphs into a wish to control your food.  You can’t control a person but you can ostensibly control yourself, turning a relational struggle into an internal conflict.

Control is also a way of protecting yourself from feelings of vulnerability. Being vulnerable is often experienced as being unprotected from potential (or probable) emotional pain.   Taking control feels active and is a solution to the passivity of vulnerability.

Conflicts with food may symbolize conflicts about wanting or needing “more” in life.  Controlling your portions can be a way of denying your needs and wants for more.  Bingeing and purging may be a way of expressing your conflict over a wish for more.

Food for thought:

What parts of your life make you feel powerless?  Powerful?

Who is (or was) the most controlling person in your life?

What do you associate with weakness?

What are you afraid will happen if you lose control of your emotions?

Have you ever “lost it” emotionally?  What were the consequences? 

What are your fears about opening up to other people?

Where did you learn to be guarded?

What do you want more of in your life?  What's it like to think about wanting more?


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Thursday, February 13, 2014

Weight of the Word














Sticks and stones can break bones and words DO hurt!  Dr. Nina talks about seven words that make you feel bad, and shares others that enhance your self-esteem. When you take off the weight of the word, you’re likely to feel better, and better about yourself.

Check out this episode!


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Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Free Bulimia Treatment

Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center are conducting an NIMH-funded study aimed at understanding brain development in adolescents with Bulimia Nervosa. 

They are recruiting girls, 12-17 years old, who binge-eat and purge. Participation involves completing interviews, games and puzzles, and an MRI scan. 

No cost treatment will be provided to girls in need. Compensation (up to $400) will also be provided for participation. The study takes place at the New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive in Manhattan. For more information, please call the Eating Disorders Clinic at  (646) 774-8066 or visit their website, http://teenbulimiastudy.org

Thursday, January 30, 2014

How To Calm Down



Do you eat when you’re stressed? In this episode, Dr. Nina teaches you four ways to relax your body and your mind. When you’re relaxed, you’re less likely to use food to calm down.

Check out this episode!


Here are some of the techniques that Dr. Nina discusses in the podcast episode.  For more details, listen to the episode


HOW TO CALM DOWN 

“I know it’s important to identify and process my feelings so that when I'm upset I don't turn to (or from) food.  Sometimes I’m too stressed out to deal with what’s going on inside.  What else can I do when I feel that way?”

Sound familiar?  If so, you may be accustomed to using disordered eating to numb, distract or comfort yourself and don’t know how else to calm down.   

Here are some ways to alleviate stress and anxiety by calming your body, centering your mind and stopping the escalation of stress.

Progressive Muscle Relaxation Exercise:  First, tighten your legs, then your stomach, and next your arms.  Make fists and keep your muscles really, really tight.  HOLD that tension as long as possible, a minimum of fifteen seconds but ideally as long as possible.  Then release. 

Feel that?  You’re probably feeling more relaxed.. The idea of this exercise is that without muscle tension, you can’t access muscle release.  When your body is relaxed, your mind will follow. 

The Four Senses Exercise:  As you know, we have five senses, but if you turn to food when you’re stressed, you’re familiar with the sense of taste and probably use taste – food – as the primary way you self-soothe.  The Four Senses exercise puts you in touch with the other four senses and helps you center yourself.

Wherever you are, look around and say one thing that you can:

Touch:_________________________________________________________________
See:____________________________________________________________________
Hear:___________________________________________________________________
Smell:__________________________________________________________________

Visualization. There are two ways to use visualization:  the first is to imagine a happy place where you feel safe and calm; the second is to think about something you’re afraid of, and imagine a positive outcome.  Keep in mind those four senses

Visualization #1: Visualize a place where you feel happy.  Where are you?  Who else is there?  Don’t limit yourself to reality; you can go anywhere your mind takes you.  In your imagination, what are you touching, seeing, hearing, and smelling?


Visualization #2:  Imagine a situation that makes you nervous, thinking about the best outcome possible.  Again, use the four senses to bring this to life.  What upcoming situation is causing you anxiety?  Whether it’s a job interview, a personal challenge, a blind date or anything else, imagine the very best outcome, visualizing and imaging the four senses.

Using these methods to calm down, along with learning to identify and process painful, difficult and upsetting emotions, will help you comfort yourself and find peace with words, instead of with restricting, bingeing and purging, or bingeing.  

When you are calm, you don't need food to cope!


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Comments and questions are welcome.  Please share on Facebook and/orTwitter so more people can benefit from the information on this blog.
For media inquiries:  Online Press Kit

Legal Disclaimer:  The content on this site is for educational and informational purposes only.  It is not intended as psychotherapy or as a substitute for psychotherapy advice, diagnosis or treatment.